Miss Lucy’s Playground Songs

Archive for the ‘Traditional songs’ Category

In Girl Scout camp, a counselor (I think her counselor name was Drako) taught us this song.

I remember the song starting with the following words:

I have not got a mansion
I haven’t any land
Not even a paper dollar
To crinkle in your hand
But I can bring you moon beams

It is a very pretty song.

This appears to be the correct version (Source: Lyrics Mania).

I may not have mansion, I haven’t any land
Not even a paper dollar to crinkle in my hands
But I can show you morning on a thousand hills
And kiss you and give you seven daffodils.

I do not have a fortune to buy you pretty things
But I can weave you moonbeams for necklaces and rings
And I can show you morning on a thousand hills
And kiss you and give you seven daffodils.

Oh, seven golden daffodils all shining in the sun
To light our way to evening when our day is done
And I will give music and a crust of bread
And a pillow of piny boughs to rest your head.

A pillow of piny boughs to rest your head…

Doe – a deer, a female deer.
Ray – a drop of golden sun.
Me – a name, I call myself.
Far – a long, long way to run.
Sew – a needle pulling thread.
La – a note to follow sew.
Tea – a drink with jam and bread.
That will bring us back to Do – oh – oh – oh . . . .

My mom used to sing this song to me.

K-K-K-Katie, beautiful Katie,
You’re the only g-g-g-girl that I adore;
When the m-m-m-moon shines,
Over the c-c-c-cowshed,
I’ll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door.

It is pronounced something like kah-kah-kah-katie.

I don’t recall this song as a child – but a few years ago, I learned to play it on the ukulele. I love it now. I hum it every once in awhile

Source: Lantern Tree

My grandfathers clock
was too large for the shelf
So it stood ninety years on the floor
It was taller by half than the old man himself
Though it weighed not a pennyweight more.

It was bought on the morn
Of the day that he was born
And was always his pleasure and pride
But it stopped short
Never to go again
When the Old Man died

Ninety years without slumbering
Tick Tock Tick Tock
His life seconds numbering
Tick Tock Tick
But it stopped short
Never to go again
When the old man died.

He watched as its pendelum rocked to and fro
Many hours he had spent as a boy
And in childhood and manhood
The clock seemed to know
And to share both his grief and his joy

For it struck twenty-four
As he entered through the door
With a blooming and beautiful bride
But it stopped short
Never to go again
When the old man died

My Grandfather said that of those he could hire
Not a servant so faithful he found
For it kept perfect time
And its only desire
At the close of each week to be wound

And it kept in its place
With a smile upon its face
And its hands never hung by its side
But it stopped short
Never to go again
When the old man died

From Preschool Music:

Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

Lost my partner, what’ll I do
Lost my partner, what’ll I do
Lost my partner, what’ll I do
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

I’ll find another one, prettier, too.
I’ll find another one, prettier, too.
I’ll find another one, prettier, too.
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

Can’t get a red bird, blue bird’ll do.
Can’t get a red bird, blue bird’ll do.
Can’t get a red bird, blue bird’ll do.
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

Flies in the sugarbowl, shoo, shoo, shoo.
Flies in the sugarbowl, shoo, shoo, shoo.
Flies in the sugarbowl, shoo, shoo, shoo.
Skip to my Lou, my darlin!

From Preschool Music:

Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns!
One a penny two a penny – Hot cross buns
If you have no daughters, give them to your sons
One a penny two a penny – Hot cross buns

We have all heard this part I think:

Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey
A kiddley divey too, wouldn’t you?
Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey
A kiddley divey too, wouldn’t you?

But this end part makes this song make much more sense.

If the words sound queer and funny to your ear, a little bit jumbled and jivey,
Sing “Mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy.”

Wikipedia goes into the history of this song – in that it was composed in 1943 by Milton Drake, Al Hoffman and Jerry Livingston.


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